Publications in: Migration and Internal Security

EP 2014-19: Key Votes: Emergency Relocation Mechanism

0n 17 September 2015, the European Parliament voted on the emergency relocation mechanism for asylum seekers arriving in Italy and Greece. This policy brief illustrates the geographic rift among MEPs from different member states and shows how the vote divided political groups on the left and right. These cleavages still undermine negotiations to reform the Common European Asylum System. more

Variable geometry risky for refugees: the Danish case

Should the Common European Asylum System accommodate various degrees of integration? With member states unable to agree on asylum reforms, flexible integration has become a temping alternative. Drawing lessons from the ongoing downgrading of refugee protection in the opt-out country of Denmark, this blog post warns that differentiated integration is not a good solution for the EU asylum policy. more

Four takeaways from Munich

Last week, Nicole Koenig joined world leaders and security experts at the 55th Munich Security Conference. This policy position summarises her four key takeaways on the EU, transatlantic relations, great power competition and emerging challenges. It lists a range of unanswered questions that will have to be monitored in the course of next year. more

Breaking the deadlock on EU asylum reform?

The reform of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) remains difficult. Recent initiatives by the Commission and a joint position paper from Germany and France sought to provide a new impetus to the negotiations. In this Policy Position, Lucas Rasche argues that there is nevertheless little hope these initiatives can lead to a breakthrough ahead of the European Parliament elections on 23-26. May 2019. more

The EU and NATO: A Partnership with a Glass Ceiling

The EUGS aims at deepening the strategic partnership between the EU and NATO. Security challenges and increasingly hybrid threats emanating from Europe’s neighbourhood underlined the need for a mutually reinforcing and complementary EU–NATO cooperation. The EUGS triggered more systematic cooperation based on seven joint priority areas. The organizations found new and creative ways to circumvent longstanding political blockades. However, these blockades still put a glass ceiling over implementation while transatlantic tensions curtail the strategic nature of this partnership. more